Liberian president speaks different language on the violence against pro-democracy protesters in Libya


Liberian president speaks different language on the violence against pro-democracy protesters in Libya.

Liberian president speaks different language on the violence against pro-democracy protesters in Libya | Print |  E-mail
Written by Thomas Kai Toteh   
Saturday, 26 February 2011 18:02
President Sirleaf of Liberia is justifying the suspicion about her alliance with Colonel Khadafi; the man who supported the bloody regime change campaign in Liberia.

It appears Liberian president is out of touch with realities in Libya, or she is playing a double standard role to avoid the wrath of her longtime ally-in the event Khadafi survives the ongoing people’s uprising.The latter holds more clues and is substantive than the former.

The press release condemning the violence in Libya was quoting Liberian government but was written by Press Secretary Cyrus Badio. It is obvious that the president signed the release on behalf of Liberian government. Unfortunately, the president’s language is not only different from the rest of the world but also raises suspicion among nations, the media, human rights and pro-democracy activists.

U.N., EU, NATO, AU and world powers are blaming Khadafi, not the people or both for the violence in Libya and are demanding Col. Khadafi to cede power in compliance with the demand of the people for democracy. But President Sirleaf was selective in her words choice– not to take side with the protesters for fear of losing her alliance with Khadafi.

Liberian government, enjoying the goodwill of U.N., EU, NATO, AU and world powers refused to support the unequivocal condemnation directed at Colonel Khadafi and his government for instigating the violence in Libya to suppress the people’s just demands for democracy and political reforms. 
 
Decoding the release, Liberian government through President Sirleaf took a stand on the violence in Libya but shows no sympathy, empathy and solidarity with pro-democracy protesters. Her judgement was clouded by sympathy for a non-demoncratic rule-to the extent that she ignores the genesis of the violence and how the peaceful campaign to institute a democratic rule in Libya was greeted with hostilities.

President Sirleaf  refused to say democracy must prevail in Libya. She refused to distinguish between the oppressed and the oppressors. And above all, she refused to support the common language of the rest of the world, whose support for justice and democracy she is reaping.

Here comes the Liberian government’s statement : “The Government of Liberia has condemned the violence in Libya and has expressed deep regrets at the loss of lives. The Liberian Government calls on Libyan leader Moammer Gaddafi and all Libyans to exercise restraint by protecting the rights of innocent and law abiding Africans and guest workers who are only in Libya to work and earn a living. An Executive Mansion release says the Liberian Government has urged all sides to the Libyan conflict not to allow the destruction of their country.”

Liberian government’s statement falls short of the common language of the world. The world has never called on all sides to stop the violence in Libya. The perpetrator of the violence has been identified. He is Col. Khadafi, not all sides.

 United Nations, NATO, EU, AU and individual countries and world powers have spoken with one voice on the violence in Libya. The language is they condemn “the brutal crackdown on protesters.” They “strongly condemn the indiscriminate and excessive use of force and lethal weapons against peaceful protesters, in violation of human rights and International Humanitarian Law, which continues to contribute to the loss of human life and the destruction of property.”

The world is weighing in on a number of punitive actions, including sanctions and isolation. Yet, Ellen Sirleaf, president of one of the founding members of United Nations, AU and as  Africa’s oldest nation, remained indecisive about her stand on the crisis in Lybia.

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